Posted in Charters, Curmudgucation, John Kuhn, poverty, Quotes, Ravitch, Teachers Unions, TeacherShortage, Testing

Random Quotes – August 2015

A PLAYGROUND BULLY

Hey, Governor Christie, Punch My Face!

It’s all over the web…New Jersey Governor Chris Christie wants to punch the “national teachers union” in the face. Christie apparently doesn’t understand — or perhaps he just doesn’t care — that the “national teachers union” is made up of millions of teachers, not to mention that there is more than one national teachers union.

On the other hand, Trump’s numbers soared after he badmouthed immigrants. Perhaps Christie’s numbers will increase when Republicans see how much he hates unions and teachers.

Was Chris Christie bullied as a child…and his teacher failed to protect him? Is that why he hates teachers so much?

In any case, the best response to the New Jersey Bully has been…

from Russ on Reading

“I regret that I have only one face to give for my profession.”

TEACHERS KNOW MORE THAN ARNE DUNCAN

CHARTERS

Indiana: Charter Advocate Says It is Time to Close Down Low-Performing Charters

People are starting to see that Charters are no better than real public schools. Thirty percent of Detroit’s charters have closed because they “failed.”

In Indiana, someone has noticed that charter schools are not doing any better than our real public schools — and, in many cases, a lot worse.

From Diane Ravitch

The hype, spin, and empty promises of the charter movement have run their course. Teach for America’s claims that its inexperienced kids could close the achievement gap are obviously hollow. Chris Barbic’s Achievement School District in Tennessee is a failure. The chickens are coming home to roost. You can’t fool all the people all the time.

TESTING

Test and Punish and Civil Rights

Has any teacher ever said, “I won’t have any idea if my students are learning without standardized test scores.”

From Peter Greene

Actually, test scores don’t tell us much of anything, because the Big Standardized Tests are narrowly focused, poorly designed, and extremely limited in their scope. Furthermore, we can predict test score results pretty well just using demographic information. So to claim that we would be fumbling in the dark without these tests, with no idea of how to find schools that were in trouble, is simply ridiculous.

TEACHER SHORTAGE

The Substitute Shortage

Schools around the nation are facing a teacher shortage and many will have to rely on substitutes. Just one problem…there’s a shortage of substitutes, too.

From Peter Greene

Substitute shortage is yet another problem to which we know the solution. It’s just that the solution costs money, and we don’t wanna. A good substitute teacher is worth her weight in gold, but we prefer to offer only peanuts.

Missouri school district billboard in Kansas

We Won’t Get Great Teachers By Treating Them Badly

How can you get more people to invest their time and energy in the quest to become a teacher?

From The Education Opportunity Network

…it just stands to reason that when you make a job more stressful and negative, you’re going to get fewer qualified people who want to do it.

DOES AMERICA REALLY HATE ITS CHILDREN?

How To Train Teachers

We live in a nation that hates education…and doesn’t really care much for our children. We’re a nation that lives only in the present. We aren’t willing to invest in our future — our children — because that would mean sacrificing a little money now.

From Peter Greene

And so we arrive at the same old problem that badgers education around every turn– we know how to do it right, but that would be expensive, and we don’t want to spend a bunch of money on education.

More children are in poverty today than before the Great Recession

How can we justify tax breaks for rich people when so many of our children live in poverty? Why isn’t this a national embarrassment?

From PBS

One out of five American children live in poverty…

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The narrow pursuit of test results has sidelined education issues of enduring importance such as poverty, equity in school funding, school segregation, health and physical education, science, the arts, access to early childhood education, class size, and curriculum development. We have witnessed the erosion of teachers’ professional autonomy, a narrowing of curriculum, and classrooms saturated with “test score-raising” instructional practices that betray our understandings of child development and our commitment to educating for artistry and critical thinking. And so now we are faced with “a crisis of pedagogy”–teaching in a system that no longer resembles the democratic ideals or tolerates the critical thinking and critical decision-making that we hope to impart on the students we teach.

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Stop the Testing Insanity!
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Author:

Retired after 35 years in public education.